How to Fill Out Form I-485

How to Fill Out Form I-485

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Note: USCIS updates immigration forms on a regular basis, you must use the most recent edition available online on the USCIS Form I-485 page. Using an outdated immigration form will lead to rejection of your application.

IMPORTANT: The Form I-485 instructions below are provided for educational purposes only and are not a substitute to legal advice.

Failure to provide truthful and complete information on Form I-485 may result in denial of your application and the immigration benefits you are seeking.

Part 1. Information About You (Person applying for lawful permanent residence)

The beneficiary of a family-based Form I-130 petition or employment-based Form I-140 petition, becomes the applicant on the Form I-485 application.

Your Current Legal Name: enter your last name, first name and middle name (if applicable)

Other Names You Have Used Since Birth (if applicable): enter your maiden name, any other names used, nicknames, etc.

Other Information About You

Date of birth: enter your date of birth in month/date/year format

If you have ever used any other dates of birth, you must provide them in month/date/year format on the last page of Form I-485 (Part 14. Additional information).

Sex: enter your gender (male or female)

City or town of birth: provide the city or town of your birth according to your birth certificate

Country of birth: enter the country of your birth according to your birth certificate

Country of citizenship or nationality: enter the country of your citizenship or nationality. If you hold more than one nationality/citizenship, enter each one separately. For additional space, use the last page of this form.

Alien Registration Number (A-number): you have an Alien Registration Number only if you have ever applied for immigration benefits in the past (for example, previously filed immigration petitions, asylum applications, placed in deportation proceedings, etc.) If you were never issued an A-number, enter “None”.

USCIS Online Account Number: you have this number only if you have created a USCIS online account in the past. If you don’t have an USCIS online account, leave this blank. You can find your USCIS online account number in your profile.

U.S. Mailing Address: enter the mailing address where you want to receive the USCIS notices, original Employment Authorization Document (EAD) card, and original green card. 

Alternate and/or Safe Mailing Address: this section is mostly used by VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) applicants. If you are not a VAWA applicant, you can enter N/A in this section.

Social Security Card

Has the Social Security Administration (SSA) ever officially issued a Social Security card to you? Answer “Yes” if you have ever applied for and receive a Social Security number. Keep in mind that your Social Security number will remain the same for your lifetime. For example, if you received an SSN during your F-1 student stay, your SSN will stay the same even after you obtain a green card. 

Include only SSNs lawfully obtained by the applicant, not fraudulent ones.

Provide your US Social Security Number (SSN): enter your Social Security Number. If you lost your SSN card, you can request a new one from the Social Security Administration. However, you will need to provide proof of your employment authorization to replace the SSN card.

Do you want the SSA to issue you a Social Security card? If you were never issued a Social Security number in the past, you can answer “Yes” to this question. A Social Security card will be mailed to you at the same time as your Form I-765 (Employment Authorization Document) is approved. 

Consent for disclosure: if you want to receive a Social Security card, answer “Yes” to this question. If you don’t need a Social Security card, leave this blank.

Recent Immigration History

Passport number used at last arrival: enter your passport number you used when you last entered the U.S.

Travel document number used at last arrival: this question applies only to applicants who do not possess a passport but rather use a travel document (for example, a Refugee Travel Document) to enter the U.S. Most applicants use passports to enter the country. If you used a passport to enter the US, enter “None” in this field.

Expiration date of this passport or travel document: enter the expiration date of the passport you used for the most recent entry in the month/day/year format.

Country that issued this passport or travel document: enter the country that issued your passport.

Nonimmigrant visa number from this passport (if any): you can find the nonimmigrant visa in the lower right hand corner of your nonimmigrant visa in red. If you entered without a visa (for example, temporary visitors from Canada, Visa Waiver Program -ESTA), enter “None” in this field.

Place of last arrival into the U.S.

City or town: you can find the city or town of your arrival on a CBP (Customs and Border Protection) stamp in your passport or obtain the online I-94 record (go to “Get this traveler’s travel history”).

State: enter the US state of your last arrival.

Date of last arrival: this date can be found either on a CBP stamp in your passport or online I-94 record.

When I last arrived in the United States, I:

Was inspected at a port of entry and admitted as (for example, exchange visitor; visitor, waived through; temporary worker; student): if you entered the US on a visa and CBP stamped your passport, choose the category that describes your visa best.

  • For J-1 visa holders, enter “Exchange visitor”
  • For tourists, business travelers, enter “Visitor”
  • For Visa Waiver Program (ESTA), enter “Waived through
  • For H-1B, L-1, TN and other temporary work visa holders, enter “Temporary worker”
  • For F-1 students enter “Student”

Was inspected at a port of entry and paroled as (for example, humanitarian parole, Cuban parole): choose this option only if you have been paroled in the U.S. Do not choose this option if you entered the U.S. on a visa or ESTA.

Came into the United States without admission or parole: choose this option if you entered the U.S. without being inspected by CBP and/or paroled. We strongly recommend you to consult with an immigration attorney before filing an I-485 application if you entered the U.S. without visa or parole.

Other: choose this option if the previous 3 options do not apply to you.

If you were issued a Form I-94 Arrival-Departure Record Number. Form I-94 Arrival-Departure Record Number – individuals who arrive to the US through an international airport are not given a hard copy of Form I-94 but the online record can be found on the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website. Enter your I-94 number in this field.

Expiration date of authorized stay shown on Form I-94 (mm/dd/yyyy): this date can be found either in your passport (if it was stamped by CBP) or in your online I-94 record in “Admit Until Date” section. If you are a F-1 or J-1 visa holder, enter D/S (Duration of Stay) in this field.

Status on Form I-94 (for example, class of admission, or paroled, if paroled): if you entered the U.S. on a visa or via Visa Waiver Program (ESTA), then choose “Class of admission”. Class of admission can be found in your I-94 online record.

What is your current immigration status (if it has changed since your arrival)?: if you have changed your nonimmigrant status since your most recent entry, provide your current status (for example, H-1B, L-1, etc.) If you have overstayed your visa, enter “Visa overstay”. If you have violated terms of your nonimmigrant status (overstayed your visa or engaged in unauthorized employment), we strongly recommend you to consult with an immigration attorney before filing your I-485 application as it can negatively impact your eligibility for permanent residence.

Provide your name exactly as it appears on your Form I-94 (if any): if you were issued Form I-94, enter your name as shown in your record. 

Part 2. Application Type or Filing Category

1.a. Family-Based. You must check one of the 5 boxes if you are applying for Adjustment of Status based on a family petition. Choose one of the 5 options that describes your category:

  1. Immediate relative of a U.S. citizen, Form I-130” – spouse, unmarried child under 21, or parent of U.S. citizen
  2. “Other relative of a U.S. citizen or relative of a lawful permanent resident under the family-based preference categories, Form I-130” – beneficiary in one of the preference categories (spouses of green card holders, unmarried children of green card holders under 21, unmarried sons and daughters of green card holders over 21, siblings of U.S. citizens, unmarried sons and daughters of US citizens over 21, or married sons and daughters of US citizen over 21
  3. “Person admitted to the United States as a fiancé(e) or child of a fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen, Form I-129F (K-1/K-2 nonimmigrant)” – fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen in the K-1 visa category who married the US citizen petitioner within 90 days of admission, or child of the fiancé(e) who was admitted in the K-2 category
  4. Widow or widower of a U.S. citizen, Form I-360” – widow or widower
  5. “VAWA self-petitioner, Form I-360” – VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) self-petitioner.

1.b. Employment-based. You must check one of the following boxes:

  • “Alien worker, Form I-140” – if you are being sponsored by an employer (EB-1B, EB-1C, EB-2, EB-4), or self-petitioning (EB-1A, EB-2 National Interest Waiver, etc.)
  • “Alien entrepreneur, Form I-526” – if you are immigrating to the US through EB-5 investor visa program

1.c. Special Immigrant. Choose one of the following boxes if you are immigrating through EB-4 visa program:

  • “Religious worker, Form I-360” – individuals coming to the U.S. to work in a religious capacity, such as ministers, priests, and religious instructors
  • “Special immigrant juvenile, Form I-360” – juveniles who have been abused, abandoned, or neglected by one or both parents, and for whom it is not in their best interest to return to their home country
  • “Certain Afghan or Iraqi national, Form I-360 or Form DS-157” – Afghan or Iraqi nationals who have worked directly or indirectly with the U.S. government in Iraq or Afghanistan
  • “Certain international broadcaster, Form I-360” – broadcasters for the United States Agency for Global Media (USAGM) or for a USAGM grantee
  • “Certain G-4 international organization or family member or NATO-6 employee or family member, Form I-360” – choose this option if you are a recently-retired, long-term G-4 nonimmigrant employee of a qualifying international organization entitled to enjoy privileges, exemptions, and immunities under the International Organizations Immunities Act, a relative of such an employee, or a long-term civilian employee of NATO (under the NATO-6 classification) or their relative

1.d. Asylee or Refugee. Choose one of the following boxes:

  • “Asylum status (INA section 208), Form I-589 or Form I-730” – choose this option if you have applied for asylum in the U.S. and your asylum request has been granted by USCIS or immigration judge. Applicants who received asylum status through a family member must choose this option as well.
  • “Refugee status (INA section 207), Form I-590 or Form I-730” – choose this option if you have obtained a refugee status.

1.e. Human Trafficking Victim or Crime Victim. Choose one of the following boxes:

  • “Human Trafficking victim (T Nonimmigrant), Form I-914 or derivative family member, Form I-914A” – if you have applied for immigration benefits as a victim of human trafficking, or spouse/child of a victim.
  • “Crime victim (U nonimmigrant), Form I-918, derivative family member, Form I-918A, or qualifying family member, Form I-929” – if you are a victim of qualifying criminal activity.

1.f. Special Programs Based on Certain Public Laws:

  • “The Cuban Adjustment Act” (CAA) – Cuban nationals who arrive in the United States and are physically present for at least one year automatically qualify for a different immigration status, known as “Cuban Adjustment.”
  • “The Cuban Adjustment Act for battered spouses and children” – the non-Cuban spouse or child of a qualifying Cuban applicant subjected to battery or extreme cruelty
  • “Dependent status under the Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness Act” – certain nationals of Haiti who had been residing in the United States could become permanent residents if applied before March 31, 2000. Although the filing period has closed for principal applicants, dependents of the principal filer may continue to apply for permanent residence
  • “Dependent status under the Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness Act for battered spouses and children” – dependents of the nationals of Haiti subjected to battery or extreme cruelty
  • “Lautenberg Parolees” – a program that allowed certain religious minorities from the former Soviet Union, Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania who were denied refugee status and subsequently paroled into the United States on a humanitarian basis to apply for lawful permanent resident status. 
  • “Diplomats or high ranking officials unable to return home (Section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957” – A-1, A-2, G-1, or G-2 nonimmigrants who failed to maintain their status and meet other requirements.
  • “Indochinese Parole Adjustment Act of 2000” – certain individuals from Vietnam, Kampuchea (Cambodia), and Laos who are eligible to adjust their status to permanent resident. Learn more on USCIS website.

1.g. Additional Options. Choose one of the following options:

  • “Diversity Visa program” – if you were selected in a green card lottery
  • “ Continuous residency in the United States since before January 1, 1972 (“Registry”)” – learn more about eligibility requirements
  • “Individual born in the United States under diplomatic status” – the child of a foreign diplomatic officer accredited by the U.S. Department of State who is born in the United States may voluntarily register for lawful permanent residence.
  • Other eligibility – choose this box if your category does not match any of the previous eligibility groups

Are you applying for adjustment based on the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 245(i)? Most applicants answer “No” to this question. You must answer “Yes” to this question, if you meet the following requirement:

  • You must be the beneficiary of a labor certification application (Form ETA 750) or immigrant visa petition (Forms I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, or I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker) filed on or before April 30, 2001

Applicants who apply for permanent residence under INA section 245(i) must additionally submit Form Supplement A to Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, AND pay an additional $1,000 filing fee.

Information About Your Immigrant Category

This section must be completed only if an immigration petition has been previously filed and registered by USCIS (for example, Form I-130 or Form I-140).

Receipt number of Underlying Petition (if any). If you are the principal applicant, enter the USCIS receipt number in this field. You can find the receipt number on the USCIS Form I-797C, Notice of Action in the “Receipt number” part. 

A “principal applicant” refers to the primary person who is applying for a particular immigration benefit or status. In many cases, this term is commonly used in family-based or employment-based immigration petitions

Priority date from the underlying petition (if any). You can find the priority date on the USCIS Form I-797C, Notice of Action in the “Priority” part. 

If you are a derivative applicant (the spouse or unmarried child under 21 years of age of a principal applicant), provide the following information for the principal applicant

A “derivative applicant” in immigration forms refers to an individual who is eligible to receive immigration benefits or status based on their relationship with the principal applicant. Derivative applicants are typically family members of the principal applicant and are included in the same immigration application or petition.

Principal applicant’s name. If you are a derivative applicant, enter the principal applicant’s name, A number, date of birth, receipt number of principal’s underlying petition and priority date of principal applicant’s underlying petition.

Part 3. Additional Information About You

This part gathers further biographical information relating to the applicant and the applicant’s family members. 

Have you ever applied for an immigrant visa to obtain permanent resident status at a U.S. Embassy or US Consulate abroad? You should answer “Yes” to this question only if you have previously filed Form DS-260 with the US Department of State and attended an interview with a consular office at a US Embassy or Consulate in your home country. Provide the location where your immigrant visa application was reviewed (city and country where a US Embassy or Consulate is located), the decision (approved, denied, etc.) and date of the decision made.

Nonimmigrant visa applications (such as tourist B-1/B-2, student visas, etc.) are not considered immigrant visa applications.

Address History

Applicants must provide complete physical address history for the last 5 years (whether in the U.S. or abroad). Physical address means the address where you have physically resided during the previous 5-year period. Provide dates you have resided at a certain address from mm/dd/yyyy to mm/dd/yyyy format. Start with your current address first and work backwards.

If you need more space to provide your physical address history, go to the last page of the Form I-485 and provide the additional information there.

Employment History

Applicants must provide their complete employment history for the previous 5 years. Start with your current or most recent employment and work backwards. You must provide the company’s name, full address, your occupation (position held in the company) and dates of employment in mm/dd/yyyy format. If you need more space to provide your employment history, enter that information on the last page of Form I-485 (Part 14. Additional information).

Part 4. Information About Your Parents

This part asks for information regarding the applicant’s parents. Enter the applicant’s mother’s and father’s first, middle, and last name. The parents’ names should match those on the applicant’s birth certificate. You must provide your parents’ name at birth (meaning the names they were given at birth) if they are different from their current legal names. If parents’ names are the same, you can enter “SAME” in the “Parent’s Name at Birth” field. Enter each parent’s date of birth, city and country of birth, and current city and country of residence. If a parent is deceased, enter “Deceased” in the city and country of current residence. If a parent’s information is unknown, enter “Unknown”.

Part 5. Information About Your Marital History

This part asks for information regarding the applicant’s current marital status and any prior marriages. 

What is your current marital status? Enter the current marital status as either: single; never married; married; divorced; widowed; marriage annulled; or legally separated. 

If you are married, is your spouse a current member of the U.S. Armed Forces or US Coast Guard? If you are married and your spouse is a current member, choose the “Yes” box. If you are not married, choose “N/A”. If you are married but your spouse is not an active member, answer “No”.

How many times have you been married (including annulled marriages and marriages to the same person)? If you have never been married before, enter “0”. Count each marriage, including annulments and marriages to the same person. Enter the total number in the box.

Information About Your Current Marriage

If you are not married, enter N/A to all questions regarding your current spouse.

Enter the current spouse’s biographical information in this section. U.S. citizens do not have A-numbers.

Is your current spouse applying with you? If your spouse is a US citizen or a green card holder, answer “No” to this question. If your spouse is applying for permanent residency together with you, answer “Yes”.

Information About Your Marital History 

Enter the name of any prior spouses and provide the place where the prior marriage took place and legally ended. The date of legal end of marriage is the date on which the divorce becomes final. 

Information About Your Children

Enter the total number of ALL your children. It is important to list ALL children, even if they are not living in the U.S. or immigrating with the applicant. You must include all your biological children, stepchildren, adopted children, those born in and out of wedlock, those born in or outside of the current marriage, those who have become emancipated, and those over whom the applicant has lost all parental rights.

Enter “0” if you do not have children.

This section asks for the name, date of birth, country of birth, and A numbers of the applicant’s living children, regardless of their age, address or marital status. Indicate whether children will be applying for permanent residency together with the applicant.

Part 7. Biographic Information

Enter the requested biographical information to Questions 1-6.

Part 8. General Eligibility and Inadmissibility Grounds

This section is the longest and most difficult since it covers all the possible grounds of inadmissibility.

Keep in mind that any “Yes” answer to any of the questions in this section may mean that the applicant is inadmissible (meaning not eligible for a green card). For this reason, you should not file the application unless you are able to evaluate whether you may be found inadmissible and if so, if you qualify for a waiver.

List all your present and past memberships in any organizations (either in the US or abroad) to which you belonged to Questions 1-13. Provide all clubs, political parties, societies, associations, and nonpolitical organizations (church membership, charity organizations, etc.) Military service must be reported as well. You must list the name of the organization, location (city, state/province and country), dates of membership in mm/dd/yyyy format, and the nature of organization (for example, professional association, nonprofit organization, etc.)

Membership in a Communist or totalitarian party, terrorist organization will be a factor in determining an applicant’s admissibility as permanent resident. If you are uncertain whether affiliation with an organization may create inadmissibility, we strongly recommend you consulting with an immigration attorney before filing you Form I-485 application.

Have you EVER been denied admission to the United States? Answer “Yes” only if you were previously denied entry into the U.S. by CBP (Customs and Border Protection). All other applicants must choose “No”.

Have you EVER been denied a visa to the United States? Answer “Yes” only if a U.S. Embassy or Consulate ever denied your visa application previously (for example, tourist B-1/B-2, F-1 visa, etc.) If your visa was ever denied, you must provide the additional information about the visa denial on the last page of Form I-485. Provide type of visa denied, location of the US Embassy or Consulate that denied the visa, date the denial was issued and the reasons for denial. All other applicants must choose “No”.

Have you EVER worked in the United States without authorization? If you have ever been employed in the US without authorization, you must answer “Yes”. Keep in mind that employment without authorization is a violation of immigration law that might lead to your green card denial. Immediate relatives of US citizens (spouses, unmarried children under 21 and parents) typically are not penalized for visa overstay and/or unauthorized employment. However, the majority of other applicants can be found inadmissible for violating the terms of their nonimmigrant status which leads to Form I-485 denial. 

Have you EVER violated the terms or conditions of your nonimmigrant status? If you have overstayed your visa, you must answer “Yes”. If you have been complying with the terms and conditions of your nonimmigrant status and never overstayed or otherwise violated the immigration law, choose “No”.

Are you presently or have you EVER been in removal, exclusion, rescission, or deportation proceedings? Answer “Yes” if you have ever been placed in deportation (removal) proceedings before the immigration judge and served a Notice to Appear (NTA). If you answered “Yes” to this question, you must provide additional information on the last page of the form and submit related documentation. In some cases, USCIS may not have jurisdiction over the application if your case is pending before an immigration judge in court. Applicants who are still in proceedings and have not been issued a final order must apply for adjustment of status before the immigration court. This application might require filing a motion to recalendar, reopen, or terminate the proceedings. 

Have you EVER been issued a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal? Individuals who have been issued a final order of deportation or removal but who have not departed the US, might still be considered in proceedings and USCIS would not have jurisdiction in such cases. Applicants who were never issued a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal must answer “No” to this question.

Have you EVER had a prior final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal reinstated? Individuals who executed the final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal by departing the U.S. and later re-entered and had that order reinstated are ineligible for Adjustment of Status. If this question does not apply to you, choose “No”.

Have you EVER held lawful permanent resident status which was later rescinded? Rescission proceedings serve the goal of removing a person’s lawful permanent resident (green card) status when USCIS determines that he or she was not eligible for adjustment of status at the time the permanent resident status was approved. Rescission places the person in the same standing that he or she would have been in if USCIS had never granted adjustment of status application. Choose “No” if this question does not apply to you.

Have you EVER been granted voluntary departure by an immigration officer or an immigration judge but failed to depart within the allotted time? If this question applies to you, this could make you ineligible for adjustment of status for a 10-year period beginning on the date the applicant failed to depart. If this question does not apply to you, answer “No”.

Have you EVER applied for any kind of relief or protection from removal, exclusion, or deportation? This includes applications for asylum, withholding of removal, cancellation of removal, etc. Answer “No” if you have never applied for any kind of relief or protection.

Have you EVER been a J nonimmigrant exchange visitor who was subject to the two-year foreign residence requirement? If you have ever been issued a J visa in the past, you must determine whether you were subject to a two-year residence requirement. To do so, review your J visa or DS-2019 form. If Form DS-2019 states that “The Exchange Visitor in the above program – Not Subject to the two-year residence requirement”, you must answer “No”. However, if your J visa and Form DS-2019 states that “The Exchange Visitor in the above program – Subject to two-year residence requirement”, it means that you might not be eligible for permanent residence unless you have obtained a waiver or you have resided outside the US for more than 2 years after your J status expired. 

If you have answered “Yes” to the previous question, you must answer the following 2 additional questions.

Have you complied with the foreign residence requirement? Answer “Yes” if you have resided outside the US for 2 years after your J status expired. If you answered “No” to this question, this might mean that you are not eligible for permanent residence at this time. You either should obtain a waiver or reside outside the US for 2 years before applying for permanent residence.

Have you been granted a waiver or has the Department of State issued a favorable waiver recommendation letter for you? If the answer to this question is “No”, you might be inadmissible as an immigrant.

Criminal Acts and Violations

Questions 25-45 ask about incidents that could trigger one of the criminal grounds of inadmissibility. These grounds cover crimes of moral turpitude, multiple criminal convictions, controlled substance violations or traffickers, prostitution or commercialized vice, criminal activity where the individual asserted immunity, foreign government officials who have committed serious violations of religious freedom, human trafficking, or money laundering. 

You must answer “Yes” to any of the following criminal history questions even if your records were sealed or otherwise cleared, you were a juvenile at the time, or you’ve been told that you no longer have a criminal record. 

You must answer “Yes” to any incidents that took place in the US or any other country in the world. 

If you answered “Yes” to any questions related to criminal records, you must provide a detailed description of each incident on the last page of Form I-485 that includes:

  • Why, where, and when you were arrested, cited, detained, or charged;
  • Outcome or disposition of any proceeding.

When listing all arrests and violations of any law, applicants can exclude traffic violations unless they resulted in criminal charges, or involved alcohol, drugs, or injury to a person or property.

Even minor crimes may negatively affect the applicant’s eligibility for permanent residence, it is important not to file the application of a person with any criminal record unless you have assessed whether any immigration consequences may result from the arrest and disposition of the case.

You must also provide certified court and police records for each incident if you answered “Yes” to any of Questions 25-45.

Security and Related

Questions 46-60 relate to possible security and terrorist-related grounds of inadmissibility. Question 49 asks if the applicant ever received any type of military, paramilitary, or weapons training. Question 55 asks if the applicant ever served in a military or police unit. If you answered “Yes” to these questions, provide an explanation of what you did or what occurred, including exact dates and locations.

Public Charge

Question 61. Are you subject to the public charge ground of inadmissibility under INA section 212(a)(4)? This question asks whether the applicant is subject to the public charge ground of inadmissibility. You must answer “Yes” to this question ONLY if you are likely to become primarily dependent on the following:

  • Public cash assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and state, tribal, territorial, or local cash benefit programs
  • Long-term institutionalization funded through Medicaid.

Most adjustment applicants are not eligible for these benefit programs, so answer “No” to this question if you are not likely to become primarily dependent on the above-mentioned programs.

If you answered “No” to question 61, you are NOT required to answer questions 62-68. Move to the next section.

If you answered “Yes” to question 61, you must additionally answer questions 62-68.

Question 62. What is the size of your household? You must include the applicant and the following individuals if they are residing with the applicant:

  • Applicant’s spouse;
  • Applicant’s parents;
  • Applicant’s unmarried siblings under 21 years of age;
  • Applicant’s unmarried children
  • Any other individuals who are listed as dependents on the applicant’s federal tax return.

Question 63. Indicate your annual household income. This amount includes the current income of the applicant and that of any of the persons included in the applicant’s household. You should also include the alimony, child support, monetary gains from any source. It cannot include income from any of public cash assistance programs or income from illegal activities.

Question 64. Identify the total value of your household assets. Assets include:

  • Savings accounts
  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Certificates of deposit
  • Real estate
  • Other assets

Assets must be readily convertible into cash within one year without considerable hardship or financial loss to the owner of assets.

If you list assets, you must include a description of the asset, proof of ownership, and the basis for the owner’s claim of its net cash value (for example, appraisal form a licensed appraiser for real estate). 

Question 65. Identify the total value of your household liabilities (including both secured and unsecured liabilities). Liabilities include:

  • Fixed and regular expenses such as mortgage payments or lease payments;
  • Car loans;
  • School tuition;
  • Child support payments.

Normal living expenses such as food, utilities, clothes, etc. should not be included in liabilities.

Question 66. What is the highest degree or level of school you have completed? This question uses terms which relate to the US education system and may not be the same in the applicant’s home country. In this case, the applicant can either indicate the equivalent in their educational system or apply the literal words.

Question 67. List your certifications, licenses, skills obtained through work experience, and educational certificates. These terms include:

  • Workforce skills training
  • Licenses for specific occupations or professions
  • Foreign language skills
  • Certificates documenting mastery or apprenticeships in skilled trades or professions

Question 68.a. Have you ever received Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), or State, Tribal, territorial, or local, cash benefits programs for income maintenance (often called “General Assistance” in the State context, but which also exist under other names)? This includes benefits the applicant received at any time in the past or is currently receiving. Do not include instances when the applicant has applied for benefits but has not received them or has only been approved for a future receipt of these benefits. Also, applicants are not required to report the situations where the applicant has applied for benefits or received them on behalf of a child or other family member.

Question 68.b. Have you ever received long-term institutionalization at government expense? This is defined as “government assistance for long-term institutionalization received by the beneficiary, including a nursing facility or mental health institution. Long-term institutionalization does not include imprisonment for conviction of a crime or institutionalization for short periods for rehabilitation purposes. If you answered “Yes” to this question, you are required to provide the information about the institution, location (city and state), the dates of institutionalization and reasons for institutionalization.

Question 68.c. If your answer to Item Number 68.a.is “Yes”, list the specific benefit(s) you received, the start and end dates of each period of receipt, and the dollar amount of benefits received. This information must be provided only if you have ever received benefits mentioned in the Question 68.a.

Question 68.d. If your answer to Item Number 68.b.is “Yes”, list the name, city, and state for each institution, the start and end dates of each period of institutionalization, and the reason you were institutionalized. This information must be provided only if you have ever received long-term institutionalization at government expense.

Illegal Entries and Other Immigration Violations

Questions 69.a-c ask if the applicant has ever been ordered removed in absentia. Being removed “in absentia” means that a person is removed, deported, or otherwise subjected to a legal action or process without being present or without their physical presence during the proceedings. This typically occurs when an individual is not physically present in a court or at an immigration hearing when a decision or order is made regarding their case. If you have ever been ordered removed in absentia, you might be ineligible for Adjustment of Status for a 10-year period. Moreover, an individual who has an unexecuted removal order must file a motion to reopen and apply for Adjustment of Status with the immigration court, not USCIS.

Questions 70-71 ask if the applicant has ever committed immigration fraud. This covers instances where the applicant:

  • Who knowingly lied to a consular officer or immigration agent at the time of admission concerning a material fact that would have made them inadmissible had they told the truth
  • Use of false written statements or false documents at the time of admission or application for a visa, employment authorization, application for other immigration benefits (for example, asylum, TPS, or re-entry permit)

There is a waiver available for this ground of inadmissibility for some applicants. 

Question 72. Have you EVER falsely claimed to be a U.S. citizen (in writing or any other way)? This would include activity such as claiming to be a US citizen on a driver’s license application, or Social Security card, voter registration, US passport, public benefit, or Form I-9 employment verification.

Question 73. Have you EVER been a stowaway on a vessel or aircraft arriving in the United States? Stowaways are not eligible for Adjustment of Status.

Question 74. Have you EVER knowingly encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted, or aided any foreign national to enter or to try to enter the United States illegally (alien smuggling)? This might include entering illegally with a child or a family member. There is a waiver for this ground of inadmissibility for those who smuggled only their spouse, parent, or child.

Question 75. Are you under a final order of civil penalty for violating INA section 274C for use of fraudulent documents? Currently USCIS does not enforce this provision and waivers are available for certain applicants.

Removal, Unlawful Presence, Illegal Reentry After Previous Immigration Violations

Have you EVER been excluded, deported, or removed from the United States or have you ever departed the United States on your own after having been ordered excluded, deported, or removed from the United States? If the answer to this question is “Yes”, then applicant may be ineligible for permanent residency, in particular:

  • Inadmissibility for 5 or 10 years depending on the type of removal order and how long the applicant remained outside the United States following the removal order
  • Permanent inadmissibility if the applicant reentered the United States without inspection and admission after a removal order on or after April 1, 1997; and
  • Reinstatement of removal if the applicant returned to the United States unlawfully after a prior order of removal

Have you EVER entered the United States without being inspected and admitted or paroled? If you answered “Yes” to this question, you might be ineligible for Adjustment of Status and unlawful presence might be triggered. You will need to consult with an immigration attorney before filing any immigration applications.

Since April 1, 1997, have you been unlawfully present in the United States:

78.a. For more than 180 days but less than a year, and then departed the United States?

78.b. For one year or more and then departed the United States?

Questions 78.a.-b are related to unlawful presence and the three or ten year bar that may have been triggered upon departing the United States. If you answered “Yes” to any of these two questions, you might not be eligible for Adjustment of Status.

Since April 1, 1997, have you EVER reentered or attempted to reenter the United States without being inspected and admitted or paroled after:

79.a. Having been unlawfully present in the United States for more than one year in the aggregate?

79.b. Having been deported, excluded, or removed from the United States?

Questions 79.a.-b are related to “permanent bar” that may have been triggered after reentering the United States illegally, or attempted to reenter illegally, after a year or more of unlawful presence or after being deported, excluded, or removed.

Miscellaneous Conduct

Questions 80-86 gather information about polygamists, child abductors, deserters, draft evaders, US citizens who renounced their citizenship for tax reasons. Answering “Yes” to any of these questions below might mean that you are ineligible for permanent residence. 

Part 9. Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities and/or Impairments

Indicate if you will be seeking certain accommodations based on being deaf or hard of hearing, blind, or some other disability or impairment.

Part 10. Applicant’s Statement, Contact Information, Declaration, Certification, and Signature

The applicant must sign and date the form in Part 10 and provide the contact information.

  • If you read and understand English, choose 1.a. “I can read and understand English, and I have read and understand every question and instruction on this application and my answer to every question”.
  • If you are not fluent in English and an interpreter helped you to understand Form I-485, indicate the foreign language you used to understand and answer the questions of the form in box 1.b. “The interpreter named in Part 11.read to me every question and instruction on this application and my answer to every question in [Indicate your native language]”. Your interpreter must provide their name, contact information, sign and date Part 11.
  • If someone assisted you in completing this form (attorney, family member, friend, etc.) choose box 2 “At my request, the preparer named in Part 12, [Preparer’s first and last name], prepared this application for me based only upon information I provided or authorized”. Your preparer must provide their name, contact information, sign and date Part 12.

Applicant’s Contact Information

Applicant’s daytime phone number: provide your cell phone number, or work number where you can be reached during business hours.

Applicant’s mobile phone number: provide your cell phone number.

Applicant’s email address: provide your email address.

Applicant’s Signature

6.a. Applicant’s Signature (sign in ink): applicant must sign the form in ink. USCIS doesn’t accept stamped or typed signatures.

6.b. Date of signature: date your form in mm/dd/yyyy format.

USCIS will reject any unsigned, undated or outdated forms.

Part 11. Interpreter’s Contact Information and Certification, and Signature

If an interpreter helped you to read and understand questions on Form I-485, they must provide their name, contact information, sign and date the form in the following section:

  • Interpreter’s Signature. 7.a. Interpreter’s Signature (sign in ink). Interpreter must sign the form in ink. USCIS doesn’t accept stamped or typed signatures.
  • 7.b. Date of signature. Interpreter must date the form in mm/dd/yyyy format

If you didn’t use an interpreter to complete the Form I-485, leave this section blank.

Part 12. Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Preparing this Application, if Other Than the Applicant

If someone (attorney, family member, friend, etc.) helped you to prepare this form, the preparer must provide their name, contact information, sign and date the form in the following section:

  • Preparer’s Statement. 7.a. – choose this box if the preparer is not an attorney or accredited representative.
  • 7.b. – choose this box if the preparer is an attorney or accredited representative
  • Preparer’s Signature. 8.a. – preparer must sign the form in ink
  • 8.b. Date of signature – preparer must date the form in mm/dd/yyyy format

Part 13. Signature at Interview

Leave this section blank. If USCIS schedules an in person interview at a local office, you will be asked to sign this part by an USCIS officer during the interview.

Part 14. Additional Information

Use this part to provide any additional information where you didn’t have enough space to provide an explanation. Indicate the page of the form, part and question number before providing your answer. 

Related Links:

Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status

Form I-485 Checklist of Required Documents

Adjustment of Status Process