Form I-864A, Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member

Form I-864A, Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member

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Last updated: April 8, 2024.

What is Form I-864A?

  • Form I-864A, officially known as the “Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member,” is a U.S. immigration form 
  • When a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (green card holder) is sponsoring a relative for an immigrant visa or green card through a family-based petition (Form I-130), the sponsor must meet the minimum income requirements
  • The sponsor (also known as “Petitioner”) submits Form I-864 (Affidavit of Support) to prove that they meet the minimum income requirements set by the U.S. government
  • When the petitioner’s income does NOT meet the minimum income requirements, petitioner can use their household member’s income to satisfy the government requirements
  • In this case, both the petitioner’s and the household member’s income and assets will be considered together to meet the financial requirements

The following individuals are considered petitioner’s household members:

  • Spouse
  • Parent
  • Child
  • Adult son or daughter
  • Sibling (if residing together with the petitioner)
  • Any other individual who was claimed as petitioner’s dependent on petitioner’s most recent federal tax return

These household members can sign Form I-864A to help the petitioner to meet the minimum income requirements.

Petitioner does NOT need to submit Form I-864A if he/she alone meets the minimum income requirements.

Form I-864A must be submitted ONLY if the petitioner alone cannot meet the minimum income requirements.

A household member who signs Form I-864A becomes liable for the intending immigrant jointly with the petitioner.

It’s important to note that the primary sponsor (the petitioner) is still required to file Form I-864, which is the main Affidavit of Support form. 

Form I-864A is an attachment to the Form I-864.

Both the petitioner and household member must provide proof of income (federal tax returns, W-2 and/or 1099 forms) with their signed forms. 

Some household members must additionally provide proof of the relationship with the petitioner and documents showing joint residence with the petitioner.

You can find the checklist of required documents for each household member below.

Which family members are considered “Household Members” for Form I-864A purposes?

To submit Form I-864A and meet the definition of a household member, the individual must be at least 18 years old. The following relatives are considered petitioner’s household members:

  • Spouse
  • Parent
  • Child
  • Adult son or daughter
  • Sibling (if residing together with the petitioner)
  • Any other individual who was claimed as petitioner’s dependent on petitioner’s most recent federal tax return

The household members can be citizens of ANY country. Proof of US citizenship or green card holder status is not required for household members. There’s no minimum period of time that the household member has to reside with the petitioner to be eligible to sign Form I-864A.

Can the intending immigrant sign Form I-864A?

In some situations, the intending immigrant’s income and/or assets can be used for meeting the minimum income requirements. The intending immigrant is the individual being sponsored by a petitioner for permanent residence. The intending immigrant can be considered to be a household member in the following situations only:

  1. The intending immigrant resides with the petitioner and the intending immigrant’s income will continue from a lawful source even after obtaining permanent residency (green card). 
  2. The intending immigrant is the petitioner’s spouse and the intending immigrant can prove that his or her income will continue from a lawful source even after obtaining permanent residency (green card).

Intending immigrants who do not have accompanying dependents (spouse and unmarried children under age 21) are not required to sign Form I-864A. 

Intending immigrants who have accompanying dependents (spouse and unmarried children under age 21) are required to sign Form I-864A.

Intending immigrants who will be using assets only are not required to sign Form I-864A. Assets must be listed on petitioner’s Form I-864.

See the checklist of required documents for both scenarios below in this article.

Can more than one household member sign Form I-864A?

Yes, more than one qualifying household member can sign Form I-864A. Each household member must sign their separate Form I-864A and provide their supporting documentation (federal tax return, W-2 and/or 1099 form(s), proof of joint residence with petitioner and proof of relationship  in some cases. 

Can a joint sponsor use household member’s income to meet the minimum income requirements?

Yes, a joint sponsor is allowed to use a qualifying household member’s income for meeting the minimum income requirements. In this case, three forms must be filed:

  • Petitioner’s Form I-864 (main sponsor)
  • Joint sponsor’s Form I-864
  • Joint sponsor’s household member Form I-864A

Household member must sign Form I-864A and submit the supporting documentation as described below.

What documents must be submitted with Form I-864A?

Household member Checklist of required documents
If the household member is the intending immigrant
  • Signed I-864A (only if you have accompanying dependents – spouse and unmarried children under 21)
  • Proof of joint residence with the petitioner (examples of acceptable documents: joint lease agreement, rent payments, letter from a landlord, affidavits from family members confirming joint residency, etc.) Proof of joint residency is not required if the intending immigrant is petitioner’s spouse
  • Proof that intending immigrant’s income will continue from lawful source after permanent residency is obtained (examples of acceptable documents: job offer or job contract that shows employment dates beyond green card approval date, a letter on business letterhead from employer stating that intending immigrant will be employed after obtaining permanent residency; if self-employed – proof of company’s ownership, company income and affidavit stating the intending immigrant’s self-employment status, plans to continue doing business after obtaining permanent residency and % of company ownership)
Spouse
  • Signed Form I-864A 
  • Spouse’s federal tax return or IRS tax transcript for the most recent year
  • Spouse’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year
Parent
  • Signed Form I-864A
  • Proof of relationship between parent and petitioner (petitioner’s birth certificate listing the parent)
  • Proof of joint residence with the petitioner (examples of acceptable documents: joint lease agreement, rent payments, letter from a landlord, affidavits from family members confirming joint residency). 
  • Parent’s federal tax return or IRS tax transcript for the most recent year
  • Parent’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year
Child
  • Signed Form I-864A
  • Proof of relationship between the child and petitioner (child’s birth certificate listing the petitioner as parent)
  • Proof of joint residence with the petitioner (examples of acceptable documents: joint lease agreement, rent payments, letter from a landlord, affidavits from family members confirming joint residency). 
  • Child’s federal tax return or IRS tax transcript for the most recent year
  • Child’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year
Adult son or daughter
  • Signed Form I-864A
  • Proof of relationship between the adult son/daughter and petitioner (adult son’s or daughter’s birth certificate listing the petitioner as parent)
  • Proof of joint residence with the petitioner (examples of acceptable documents: joint lease agreement, rent payments, letter from a landlord, affidavits from family members confirming joint residency). 
  • Adult son’s or daughter’s federal tax return or IRS tax transcript for the most recent year
  • Adult son’s or daughter’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year
Sibling
  • Signed Form I-864A
  • Proof of relationship between the sibling and petitioner (sibling’s and petitioner’s birth certificates listing at least one common parent)
  • Proof of joint residence with the petitioner (examples of acceptable documents: joint lease agreement, rent payments, letter from a landlord, affidavits from family members confirming joint residency). 
  • Sibling’s federal tax return or IRS tax transcript for the most recent year
  • Sibling’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year
Any other individual who was claimed as petitioner’s dependent on petitioner’s most recent federal tax return
  • Signed Form I-864A
  • Individual’s all W-2 and/or 1099 form(s) for the most recent year (if applicable)

If for some reasons a household member or any other relative is unable to obtain the required documents, this individual can become a joint sponsor if they meet certain requirements.

Joint sponsors must be at least 18 years of age, be a US citizen or permanent resident and meet the minimum income requirements. You can learn more about joint sponsors in our article.

Related Links:

Form I-864A Instructions

How to fill out Form I-864A, Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member