Form I-130 Instructions, Petition for Alien Relative

Form I-130 Instructions

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What is Form I-130?

  • Form I-130, officially known as the “Petition for Alien Relative,” is an immigration form used by a U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident (green card holder) to sponsor certain family members who wish to immigrate to the U.S.
  • The purpose of Form I-130 is to establish the relationship between the petitioner (the U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident) and the beneficiary (the family member being sponsored)
  • This form is used to sponsor the following family members:
  • Once Form I-130 is approved, the beneficiary may proceed with:
  • Learn more: Form I-130

What is Form I-130A?

  • Form I-130A, officially known as the “Supplemental Information for Spouse Beneficiary,” is a supplementary form that is filed along with Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative
  • It gathers additional information about the beneficiary when the petitioner is filing for a spouse
  • Form I-130A must be filed with Form I-130 ONLY if a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident is petitioning for their spouse
  • All other categories (child, parent, sibling) do not need to file Form I-130A
  • Form I-130A must be filed at the same time as Form I-130
  • Learn more: Form I-130A

Who can file Form I-130?

The following individuals can file Form I-130:

Petitioner (sponsor)

Beneficiary (family member)

U.S. citizen
Green Card Holders

Who cannot file Form I-130?

The following individuals cannot be sponsored by filing Form I-130:

  • Grandparents
  • Grandchild
  • Nephew
  • Niece
  • Uncle
  • Aunt
  • Cousin
  • Parent-in-law 
  • Spouse if both spouses were not both physically present at the marriage ceremony unless the marriage was consummated
  • A spouse if the petitioner obtained a green card through a prior marriage to a US citizen or lawful permanent resident. Exceptions:
    • Petitioner has naturalized
    • Petitioner has been a lawful permanent resident for at least 5 years
    • Petitioner can establish that the prior marriage was not fraudulent
    • Prior marriage was terminated by the death of prior spouse
  • An adoptive parent or adoptive child if:
    • Adoption took place after the child turned 16 years of age, or
    • Child has not been in the legal 
  • A natural parent if:
    • Petitioner obtained a green card or US citizenship through adoption, or
    • Petitioner obtained a green card as a special immigrant juvenile
  • Stepparent or stepchild if the marriage that created the relationship took place after the child turned 18 years of age
  • Any person who entered into or conspired to enter into a marriage in order to evade US immigration laws (fraudulent marriage)

How many Forms I-130 do I need to file?

The number of Form I-130 petitions you need to file depends on the category: 

Category

How many Form I-130s to file

U.S. citizen filing for a spouse, child or parent
  • File a separate Form I-130 for each family member
U.S. citizen filing for:

  • Unmarried sons or daughter 21 years or older
  • Married sons and daughters of any age
  • Brothers and sisters
  • File a separate Form I-130 for each family member
  • You are not required to file separate petitions for the beneficiary’s spouse or unmarried children under 21. They are considered derivative beneficiaries
Permanent resident filing for a spouse, unmarried child under 21 or unmarried children over 21
  • File a separate Form I-130 for each family member
  • You are not required to file separate petitions for the beneficiary’s unmarried children under 21. They are considered derivative beneficiaries

Form I-130 step-by-step process

Here’s Form I-130 step-by-step guide to the process:

Step 1. Determine Eligibility: 

  • Before beginning the application process, ensure that you meet the eligibility criteria to sponsor a family member (see above)
  • U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (green card holders) can file Form I-130 for certain eligible family members

Step 2. Gather Required Documents: 

  • Collect all necessary documents including:
    • Supporting evidence of your relationship with the beneficiary (such as birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc.)
    • Proof of your U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent resident status 
    • Passport-style photos of petitioner and beneficiary (if sponsoring a spouse)
    • Proof of bona fide marriage (if sponsoring a spouse)
    • See the full checklist for each category below

Step 3: Submit Form I-130:

  • Complete Form I-130: 
    • If filing online, create a new USCIS account or use your current account to complete Form I-130
    • If filing by mail, download the most recent edition of Form I-130 from the official USCIS website
    • Failure to use the most recent edition of Form I-130 will lead to rejection of your application
    • If sponsoring a spouse, download the most recent edition of Form I-130A from the official USCIS website
    • The spouse being sponsored must fill out Form I-130A, sign and date it. If your spouse is abroad, you can provide a scanned copy of the original signed Form I-130
    • Fill out Form I-130 accurately and completely
    • If a question does not apply to you, enter “N/A” (not applicable)
    • Submit all pages of the form, even if they are blank
    • Provide all requested information, including your personal details, information about the beneficiary, and details about your relationship with the beneficiary
  • Prepare a filing fee:
    • If filing online, you can make the payment online using a credit card
    • If filing by mail, prepare a money order, personal check, cashier’s check or credit card payment authorization (Form G-1450)
    • Check the most current Form I-130 filing fee on the USCIS website
  • Concurrent filing:
    • If the beneficiary is in the U.S., immediate relatives can file Form I-130 and Forms I-485, I-864, I-765 and I-131 concurrently (at the same time, even before Form I-130 is approved)
    • If F2A beneficiary is in the U.S. and the priority date for F2A is current, Forms I-130, I-485, I-864, I-765 and I-131 can be filed concurrently as well
    • Learn more: What is Concurrent Filing?
  • Submit the Petition: 
    • If filing online, submit the application online
    • If filing by mail, mail the completed Form I-130 along with supporting documents and the required filing fee to the appropriate USCIS address
    • Submit Form G-1145 with the application to receive a text message or email with the receipt number from USCIS
    • If filing by mail, mail the completed application via express mail with a tracking number
    • Make a copy of the completed application for your records

Step 4. Receive Receipt Notice: 

  • If filing online, Form I-130 receipt notice will be available in your online USCIS account within 15 minutes
  • If filing by mail, you should receive an email and/or text message with a receipt number 7 days after the application is submitted (if you submitted Form G-1145)
  • Hard copy notice confirming that USCIS received your application will arrive 2 weeks after the submission date 
  • You can track the status of your application in your online USCIS account or on the USCIS website (enter the receipt number)

Step 5. Wait for Processing: 

  • USCIS will review your petition and supporting documents to determine eligibility. For most applications (immediate relatives and F2A category), it takes about 12 months to get Form I-130 approved
  • Other categories (such as F1, F2B, F3 and F4) take longer time to process
  • Request for Additional Evidence (if applicable): If USCIS requires additional evidence or documentation to support your petition, they will issue a Request for Evidence (RFE)
  • Respond to the RFE (if requested by USCIS) promptly with the requested information to avoid delays in processing

Step 6. Receive Approval Notice or Denial: 

  • Once USCIS approves your petition, they will issue an approval notice
  • If your petition is denied, USCIS will provide reasons for the denial, and you may have the option to appeal the decision or refile a new petition

Step 7. Immigrant Visa Application or Adjustment of Status:

  • Consular Processing (for beneficiaries residing outside the U.S.): 
    • If you indicated on Form I-130 that the beneficiary will apply for an immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate, the approved Form I-130 will be transferred to the National Visa Center (NVC) 
    • If the priority date is current, it typically takes anywhere from 1 week to 1 month to receive an email with the NVC Case Number and Invoice ID number
    • If your priority date is not current yet, you will not receive an email from NVC. Learn more: How to Read the Visa Bulletin for Family-Based Immigrants
    • After Form DS-260, civil documents and Affidavit of Support, along with tax documents are submitted, NVC will review the application
    • It can take anywhere from 1 week to 1 month for NVC to review the application. Check current NVC processing times
    • If NVC needs additional documents, you will receive an email and/or message in online DS-260 account
    • If NVC sends an email or message saying that the documents are “documentarily qualified”, it means that the case is forwarded to the US Embassy/Consulate for interview scheduling
    • Interview and Visa Issuance: The beneficiary attends an interview at the U.S. embassy or consulate in their home country
    • If approved, beneficiary will receive an immigrant visa, allowing them to enter the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident
    • Immigrant visas are typically valid for 6 months
    • USCIS Immigrant Fee must be paid prior to entering the U.S.
    • Entry to the U.S.: Once the beneficiary enters the U.S., the immigrant visa will be stamped so it can serve as a temporary 1-year green card
    • Within 90 days the beneficiary will receive a permanent resident card (green card) in the mail, confirming their status as a lawful permanent resident
  • Adjustment of Status (for beneficiaries in the U.S.):
    • If you indicated on Form I-130 that the beneficiary will apply for Adjustment of Status in the U.S., forms I-485, I-864, I-765 and I-131 can be filed with USCIS
    • Beneficiary will attend a biometrics appointment (approximately 1-2 months after the application is filed)
    • Beneficiary might be scheduled to appear at a local USCIS office for interview
    • The average Adjustment of Status processing time for family-based immigrants is 12 months 
    • If approved, beneficiary will receive a green card by mail

Form I-130 filing fee

  • Form I-130 filing fee is $535
  • If filing online, the fee can be paid by a credit card
  • If filing by mail, USCIS accepts money orders, personal checks, cashier’s checks and credit card payments (Form G-1450)
  • If paying by check, money order or cashier’s check, make it payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (no abbreviations)
  • USCIS fees are subject to change, check the most current Form I-130 filing fee

Form I-130 checklist of documents

Form I-130 checklist for spouse

Submit photocopies of the following documents if sponsoring a spouse:

Required evidence

Examples of acceptable documents

Completed Forms I-130 and I-130A
  • Form I-130 signed and dated by the petitioner
  • Form I-130A signed and dated by the beneficiary
Filing fee
  • Filing fee of $535
  • Check the most current filing fee on the USCIS website
Proof of petitioner’s immigration status If the petitioner is a US citizen, provide at least one of the following:

  • U.S. birth certificate if born in the United States;
  • Certificate of Naturalization if became a U.S. citizen through naturalization
  • Certificate of Citizenship if citizenship was obtained through parent
  • Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) if petitioner is U.S. citizen by birth abroad to a U.S. citizen parent;
  • Biometrics page from unexpired U.S. passport

If the petitioner is a permanent resident, provide the following:

  • Front and back of the Permanent Resident Card (Green Card or Form I-551); or
  • Valid I-551 stamp (immigrant visa stamped by CBP) passport page
Marriage certificate 
  • Marriage certificate
Proof of termination of previous marriage(s) If the petitioner and the beneficiary were previously married, proof that the previous marriage(s) were terminated for both spouses:

  • Divorce decree
  • Annulment decree
  • Death certificate
Proof of legal name change  If the petitioner and/or the beneficiary have ever changed their names, proof of legal name change:

  • Marriage Certificate
  • Divorce Decree
  • Court Order of Name Change
Proof of bona fide marriage
  • Birth certificates of children born to the couple 
  • Religious marriage certificate (if applicable)
  • Jointly filed Federal IRS income tax returns for each year
  • Driver’s license, state issued photo ID, or other photo identification cards for both spouses showing their shared address
  • Joint checking or savings account statements
  • Joint credit card account statements
  • Engagement ring receipts
  • Wedding expenses
  • Deeds showing joint ownership of home 
  • Joint lease agreement
  • Joint car ownership documents (title, loan, etc.)
  • Life insurance policies
  • Joint health insurance plans 
  • Joint car insurance
  • Joint utility bills
  • Joint phone bills
  • Employment records showing the spouse listed as an emergency contact
  • Text messages
  • Phone calls
  • Joint vacations documentation (airline tickets, hotel reservations, etc).
  • Photographs of the couple (each photograph must have a detailed description – date, place, occasion, people depicted in the picture)
  • Notarized affidavits from people who have personal knowledge of the couple’s relationship and marriage
Passport-style photographs
  • If filing online – 1 digital passport-style photograph of each spouse
  • If filing by mail – 2 printed color passport-style photographs of each spouse
English translation
  • If any of the supporting documents are in a foreign language, provide certified English translations
  • Attach the photocopy of the original document in foreign language

Form I-130 checklist for child 

Submit photocopies of the following documents if sponsoring a child:

Required evidence

Examples of acceptable documents

Completed Form I-130
  • Form I-130 signed and dated by the petitioner
Filing fee
  • Filing fee of $535
  • Check the most current filing fee on the USCIS website
Proof of petitioner’s immigration status If the petitioner is a US citizen, provide at least one of the following:

  • U.S. birth certificate if born in the United States;
  • Certificate of Naturalization if became a U.S. citizen through naturalization
  • Certificate of Citizenship if citizenship was obtained through parent
  • Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) if petitioner is U.S. citizen by birth abroad to a U.S. citizen parent;
  • Biometrics page from unexpired U.S. passport

If the petitioner is a permanent resident, provide the following:

  • Front and back of the Permanent Resident Card (Green Card or Form I-551); or
  • Valid I-551 stamp (immigrant visa stamped by CBP) passport page
If petitioner is the child’s mother
  • Child’s long-form birth certificate listing the petitioner as a mother
If petitioner is the child’s father
  • Child’s long-form birth certificate listing both parents’ names
  • Marriage certificate showing petitioner’s marriage to the child’s mother
  • Proof of termination of all prior marriage(s) of the child’s parents (if applicable)
If petitioner is the child’s father and child was born out of wedlock
  • Child’s long-form birth certificate listing both parents’ names
  • Proof that the petitioner was married the child’s mother before the child’s 18th birthday, OR
  • Evidence that the child was legitimated under the law of the child’s or father’s residence or domicile (for example, paternity certificate)

If the child was NOT legitimated before 18th birthday:

  • Evidence of bona fide parent-child relationship existed between father and the child (child support payments, proof of residing with the child, affidavits, photographs, medical records listing father as a parent, etc.)
If sponsoring an adopted child
  • Adoption decree showing that the adoption took place before the child turned 16 years of age
  • Exception: if petitioner adopted a child under 16 years of age, and also adopted older siblings of that child, Form I-130 can be filed for the older child if the adoption occurred before the sibling turned 18 years of age
  • Evidence that an adopted child was in the legal custody of and resided with the parents who adopted him/her for at least 2 years before or after adoption
Marriage certificate (if sponsoring a stepchild)
  • Marriage certificate showing that the petitioner married the child’s parent prior to child’s 18th birthday
  • Proof of termination of previous marriage(s) of the petitioner and child’s biological parent
English translation
  • If any of the supporting documents are in a foreign language, provide certified English translations
  • Attach the photocopy of the original document in foreign language

Form I-130 checklist for parent

Submit photocopies of the following documents if sponsoring a parent:

Required evidence

Examples of acceptable documents

Completed Form I-130
  • Form I-130 signed and dated by the petitioner
  • A separate Form I-130 must be filed for each parent
Filing fee
  • Filing fee of $535
  • Check the most current filing fee on the USCIS website
Proof of petitioner’s U.S. citizenship Note: Petitioner must be at least 21 years of age to file Form I-130 for parent

 Provide at least one of the following:

  • U.S. birth certificate if born in the United States;
  • Certificate of Naturalization if became a U.S. citizen through naturalization
  • Certificate of Citizenship if citizenship was obtained through parent
  • Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) if petitioner is U.S. citizen by birth abroad to a U.S. citizen parent;
  • Biometrics page from unexpired U.S. passport
If sponsoring a mother
  • Petitioner’s long-form birth certificate listing mother as a parent
If sponsoring a father
  • Petitioner’s long-form birth certificate listing both parents
  • Petitioner’s parents’ marriage certificate
  • If either parent was previously – proof of previous marriage(s) termination (divorce decree, annulment decree, death certificate)
If sponsoring a stepparent
  • Petitioner’s long-form birth certificate listing both parents
  • Marriage certificate showing that stepparent married the petitioner’s natural parent before petitioner turned 18 years of age
If sponsoring an adopted parent
  • Adoption decree showing that adoption took place before the petitioner turned 16 years of age
English translation
  • If any of the supporting documents are in a foreign language, provide certified English translations
  • Attach the photocopy of the original document in foreign language

Form I-130 checklist for brother or sister

Submit photocopies of the following documents if sponsoring a brother or sister:

Required evidence

Examples of acceptable documents

Completed Form I-130
  • Form I-130 signed and dated by the petitioner
  • A separate Form I-130 must be filed for each sibling
  • A separate petition is not required for sibling’s spouse and unmarried children under 21. They are considered derivative beneficiaries 
Filing fee
  • Filing fee of $535
  • Check the most current filing fee on the USCIS website
Proof of petitioner’s U.S. citizenship Note: Petitioner must be at least 21 years of age to file Form I-130 for sibling

 Provide at least one of the following:

  • U.S. birth certificate if born in the United States;
  • Certificate of Naturalization if became a U.S. citizen through naturalization
  • Certificate of Citizenship if citizenship was obtained through parent
  • Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) if petitioner is U.S. citizen by birth abroad to a U.S. citizen parent;
  • Biometrics page from unexpired U.S. passport
Proof of relationship
  • Petitioner’s birth certificate and sibling’s birth certificate showing that you have at least one common parent

If petitioner and the sibling have a common father but different mothers:

  • Marriage certificates showing that your father was married to each mother
  • Proof of any prior marriage(s) termination of either your father or mothers
English translation
  • If any of the supporting documents are in a foreign language, provide certified English translations
  • Attach the photocopy of the original document in foreign language

How to fill out Form I-130 step-by-step

Let’s start with general Form I-130 instructions:

  • Current edition of forms: make sure that you are using the current edition of the Form I-130. The most current edition is available on the USCIS website
  • USCIS will reject any outdated editions of the form
  • Sign and date the form
  • If you need extra space to complete any item on Form I-130, go to the last page of the form – Part 9. Additional Information. Indicate the Page Number, Part Number, and Item Number to which your answer refers.
  • Answer all questions fully and accurately
  • If an item is not applicable or the answer is “none,” type or print “N/A” 
  • You must sign the form in ink. Stamped or typed signatures are not accepted

IMPORTANT: The instructions provided below are based on the version of Form I-130 that was current at the time of article publication. USCIS frequently updates the immigration forms. If you are using a different edition of Form I-130, you can use the instructions below as general guidelines on providing information about the petitioner and beneficiary on Form I-130.

For USCIS Use Only: leave this section blank.

To be completed by an attorney or Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)-accredited representative: leave it blank if you are not being represented by an attorney or representative.

Part 1. Relationship (You are the Petitioner. Your relative is the Beneficiary)

This part is being completed by the Petitioner (U.S. citizen or permanent resident).

Question 1. I am filing this petition for my: Check the appropriate box to indicate for whom the petitioner (U.S. citizen or permanent resident) is filing Form I-130 from the following options: 

  • Spouse
  • Parent
  • Brother/Sister
  • Child

You can select only one box. 

Question 2. If you are filing this petition for your child or parent, select the box that describes your relationship (Select only one box): if the petitioner is sponsoring a spouse or a sibling, leave this blank. If petitioner is sponsoring a parent or a child, select one of the following boxes:

  • Child was born to parents who were married to each other at the time of the child’s birth
  • Stepchild/Stepparent – petitioner is eligible to sponsor a stepchild or a stepparent only if the marriage that created the stepparent/stepchild relationship took place prior to the child’s 18th birthday
  • Child was born to parents who were not married to each other at the time of the child’s birth – if a child was born out of wedlock, there are additional documents required for showing the father-child relationship (see above)
  • Child was adopted (not an Orphan or Hague Convention adoptee) – if the immigration forms I-600/I-600A or I-800/I-800A have not been used, Form I-130 can be filed in certain circumstances.  Petitioner will need to provide documentation showing that:
    • Adoption took place prior to the child’s 16th birthday (or prior to the child’s 18th birthday if an older sibling of the child was adopted by the same parent prior to the sibling’s 16th birthday)
    • The adopted child must have resided in the physical and legal custody of the parent for at least two years prior to filing Form I-130

Question 3. If the Beneficiary is your brother/sister, are you related by adoption? If the petitioner is not sponsoring a sibling, leave this section blank. If petitioning a sibling and you are related by adoption, answer “Yes”. If the petitioner and sibling have at least one common natural parent, answer “No”.

Question 4 – Did you gain lawful permanent resident status or citizenship through adoption? This question must be answered by all petitioners. Answer “Yes” if the petitioner obtained either permanent resident status or U.S. citizenship through adoption. 

Part 2. Information About You (Petitioner) 

This section collects information about the U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Question 1. Alien Registration Number (A-Number) (if any): Enter petitioner’s Alien Registration Number (also known as an “A-Number”, “A#”, “USCIS #”) here, if the petitioner has one. U.S. citizens who were born in the U.S. or born abroad to US citizen parents do not have A-numbers.

A-Numbers are usually assigned when an immigrant petition or application for Adjustment of Status is filed, or if the person has previously been issued an immigrant visa. 

An A-Number is also assigned to individuals placed in removal or deportation proceedings. If a petitioner obtained US citizenship through naturalization or parent’s naturalization, the A-number will be printed on the naturalization or citizenship certificate.

Question 2. USCIS Online Account Number (if any): If the petitioner has ever created an USCIS Online Account Number, enter it here.

If the petitioner has previously filed certain applications or petitions on a paper form, they may have received a USCIS Online Account Access Notice issuing a USCIS Online Account Number. 

The USCIS Online Account Number (if any) can be found at the top of the notices for the previously filed petition or application. 

The USCIS Online Account Number is NOT the same as an A-Number.

If you don’t know or don’t have an USCIS online account number, leave this field blank.

Question 3. U.S. Social Security Number (if any): enter petitioner’s U.S. Social Security Number.

Question 4. Your Full Name: Enter the petitioner’s family name (last name), given name (first name), and middle name (if any). Provide the petitioner’s full legal name as shown on their birth certificate. If the petitioner legally changed their name, provide the current legal name as shown on the name change document (for example, a marriage certificate or legal name change court order). If the petitioner has legally changed their name, legal name-change documents should be submitted with the application.

Question 5. Other Names Used: List all other names the petitioner has ever used, including:

  • Aliases
  • Maiden name
  • Nicknames
  • Any variations of different spelling used

If you need additional space to answer this question, provide it on the last page of the form (Part 9. Additional Information). If this question does not apply to the petitioner, enter “N/A” in this field.

Other Information

Question 6. City/Town/Village of Birth – enter the petitioner’s place of birth (city/town/village) as shown on their birth certificate.

Question 7. Country of Birth – Enter the petitioner’s country of birth as listed on their birth certificate.

Question 8. Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) – Enter the petitioner’s date of birth in the month/day/year format as shown on their birth certificate.

Question 9. Sex – Choose “Male” or “Female.” If the petitioner’s current gender is different from the gender listed on their birth certificate, additional documentation will be required. 

Question 10.  Mailing Address – enter the petitioner’s mailing address where they would like to receive notices from USCIS by mail. If the petitioner wants to receive mail at someone else’s address, enter that person’s name in the “In Care of Name” field.

Question 11. Is your current mailing address the same as your physical address? – Answer “Yes” if the petitioner’s mailing address provided above is the same as their current physical address. If not, choose “No” and provide the petitioner current physical address in Questions 12.a.-12.h.

Address History

Questions 12-15. Physical address 1, Physical address 2 – enter the petitioner’s physical address history over the last 5 years (in the US or overseas). Provide the current physical address first. For each physical address enter the dates residence started and ended in the mm/dd/yyyy format.

Make sure to accurately list each physical address for the last 5 years. Failure to provide complete and accurate information might lead to complications in processing of Form I-130 or any further application. If you need additional space to provide all addresses, enter it in Part 9 Additional Information.

Your Marital Information

Question 16. How many times have you been married? – Enter the total number of times the petitioner has been married. If the petitioner has never been married, enter “0.” If the petitioner is currently married and never been married previously, enter “1.” Count all marriages, including annulled marriages. If the petitioner married the same person more than one time, each marriage should be counted as separate. For example, if petitioner Mike married Nancy and later divorced her. Several years later, Mike married Nancy again. Mike’s marriage should be counted as 2.

Question 17. Marital Status – check the box that reflects the petitioner’s current marital status. Check only one box:

  • Single, Never Married
  • Married
  • Divorced
  • Widowed
  • Separated
  • Annulled

Question 18. Date of Current Marriage (if currently married): if the petitioner is not currently married, enter “N/A” in this field. If the petitioner is currently married, enter the marriage date in the month/day/year format as listed on the government-issued marriage certificate.

Question 19. Place of Current Marriage (if married): if the petitioner is not currently married, enter “N/A” in this field. If the petitioner is currently married, enter the place, state or provide and country of the marriage as listed on the government-issued marriage certificate.

Names of All Your Spouses (if any)

Spouse 1 & 2. Questions 20-23 – If the petitioner has ever been married, enter the names of all spouses and the dates on which each marriage ended. If the petitioner is currently married, enter “N/A” in the “Date Marriage Ended” field for the current marriage. Enter the petitioner’s current spouse first if the petitioner is currently married. For the “Date Marriage Ended” dates use the date a divorce became final as shown on the petitioner’s divorce decree or annulment decree. If the petitioner needs additional space to provide all previous spouses’ names, enter it in Part 9 Additional Information.

Information About Your Parents

Parent 1’s Information

In this section, provide information about the petitioner’s father. If any information is unknown (for example, date of birth or city of current residence), enter “Unknown”.

Full Name of Parent 1. Questions 24.a.-24.c. – Enter the petitioner’s father’s full name in these fields.

Question 25. Date of Birth –  enter the petitioner’s father’s date of birth in the month/day/year format.

Question 26. Sex – select “Male”.

Question 27. Country of Birth – enter the petitioner’s father’s country of birth. If unknown, enter “Unknown”.

Question 28. City/Town/Village of Residence – enter the city/town/village where the petitioner’s father currently resides (physical address). If unknown, enter “Unknown”. If deceased, enter “Deceased” in this field.

Question 29. Country of Residence – enter the country where the petitioner’s father currently resides (physical address). If unknown, enter “Unknown”. If deceased, enter “Deceased” in this field.

Parent 2’s Information

In this section, provide information about the petitioner’s mother. If any information is unknown (for example, date of birth or city of current residence), enter “Unknown”.

Full Name of Parent 2. Questions 30.a.-30.c. – Enter the petitioner’s mother’s full name in these fields.

Question 31. Date of Birth –  enter the petitioner’s mother’s date of birth in the month/day/year format.

Question 32. Sex – select “Female”.

Question 33. Country of Birth – enter the petitioner’s mother’s country of birth. If unknown, enter “Unknown”.

Question 34. City/Town/Village of Residence – enter the city/town/village where the petitioner’s mother currently resides (physical address). If unknown, enter “Unknown”. If deceased, enter “Deceased” in this field.

Question 35. Country of Residence – enter the country where the petitioner’s mother currently resides (physical address). If unknown, enter “Unknown”. If deceased, enter “Deceased” in this field.

Additional Information About You (Petitioner)

Provide the petitioner’s information in this section.

Question 36. I am a (Select only one box):

  • U.S. citizen – check this box if you are a U.S. citizen (through birth, naturalization or parents)
  • Lawful permanent resident – check this box if you are a green card holder

If you are a U.S. citizen, complete Item Number 37.

Question 37. My citizenship was acquired through (Select only one box): If petitioner is a green card holder, leave questions 37-39.c. blank. If petitioner is a U.S. citizen, select only one of the following boxes:

  • Birth in the United States – select this box if the petitioner was born in the U.S.
  • Naturalization – select this box if the petitioner obtained U.S. citizenship through naturalization process and was issued a naturalization certificate
  • Parents – select this box if the petitioner obtained U.S. citizenship through parents. This box must be selected in the following situations:
    • If the petitioner was born abroad to U.S. citizen parents and obtained a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA)
    • If the petitioner became a U.S. citizen through naturalization of their parents (if the petitioner’s parent became a naturalized US citizen before the petitioner turned 18 years of age, the petitioner automatically became a U.S. citizen. In such a case, the petitioner was issued a Citizenship Certificate.

Question 38. Have you obtained a Certificate of Naturalization or a Certificate of Citizenship? – If the petitioner was born in the U.S. or was born outside the US and obtained a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, answer “No”. If the petitioner obtained US citizenship through naturalization process or obtained citizenship through parent’s naturalization, answer “Yes” and answer the questions 39.a.-39.c.

If you answered “Yes” to Item Number 38., complete the following: The petitioner will need to answer the questions 39.a.-39.c. only if the petitioner was issued a Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship. If the petitioner was born in the US or born abroad but obtained a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), leave these questions blank.

You will need to have the petitioner’s naturalization certificate or citizenship certificate to answer the following questions:

Question 39.a. Certificate Number – this information is printed on the naturalization or citizenship certificate. Enter the certificate number (do not enter the Alien Registration Number). 

Question 39.b. Place of Issuance – enter the place of issuance. This information is printed on the naturalization or citizenship certificate. Typically, it’s the city and state of the local USCIS office that processed naturalization or citizenship application.

Question 39.c. Date of Issuance (mm/dd/yyyy) – enter the date of the certificate issuance.

If you are a lawful permanent resident, complete Item Numbers 40.a.-41. – If the petitioner is a US citizen, enter “N/A” in these fields. If the petitioner is a permanent resident, answer the following questions:

Question 40.a. Class of Admission – the petitioner’s class of admission can be found on the green card in the “Category” field.

Question 40.b. Date of Admission (mm/dd/yyyy) – the petitioner’s date of admission is listed on the green card in the “Resident since” field.

Place of Admission

Question 40.c. City or Town and Question 40.d State– If the petitioner obtained permanent resident status through entering the U.S. on an immigrant visa, provide the location of the CBP (Customs and Border Patrol) port of entry that admitted them on an immigrant visa. If the petitioner obtained their green card through adjustment of status (I-485), then enter the USCIS Field Office location or USCIS Service Center that approved their I-485 application. 

Question 41. Did you gain lawful permanent resident status through marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident? – Answer “Yes” if the petitioner obtained their green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. Answer “No” if the petitioner did not obtain their green card through marriage to a US citizen or permanent resident. Keep in mind that if the petitioner obtained their green card through a previous marriage to a US citizen or permanent resident, and then files Form I-130 for a new spouse, certain requirements must be met. Lawful permanent resident petitioner cannot file Form I-130 to sponsor a new spouse, unless the following can be demonstrated:

  • Petitioner has naturalized
  • Petitioner has been a lawful permanent resident for at least 5 years
  • Petitioner can establish that the prior marriage was not fraudulent
  • Prior marriage was terminated by the death of prior spouse

Employment History

Employer 1 & Employer 2. Questions 42 – 49.b. – enter the petitioner’s employment history for the last 5 years (in the US or outside the U.S.) List the current employment first. The petitioner will need to provide the names and addresses of each employer, their occupations (positions), and the dates of employment for all positions they have held over the previous 5 years. If you need additional space to provide full employment information, enter it in Part 9 Additional Information.

Part 3. Biographic Information

Provide the petitioner’s biographical information in this section.

Question 1. Ethnicity (Select only one box): Select only one box to indicate whether the petitioner is “Hispanic or Latino” or “Not Hispanic or Latino.” An individual is considered Hispanic or Latino if they are of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

Question 2. Race (Select all applicable boxes): Check all applicable boxes to indicate the petitioner’s race(s):

  • White – an individual having origins in Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa
  • Asian – an individual having origins in the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, Japan, China, India, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam
  • Black or African American – an individual having origins in the black racial groups of Africa
  • American Indian or Alaska Native – an individual having origins in North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – an individual person having origins in Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands

Question 3. Height – Provide the petitioner’s current height in feet and inches

Question 4. Weight – Provide the petitioner’s current weight in pounds. 

Question 5. Eye Color (Select only one box): Select one box that most closely matches the petitioner’s eye color

Question 6. Hair Color (select only one box) – Select one box that most closely matches the petitioner’s hair color or select “Bald” if the petitioner is currently bald. 

Part 4. Information About Beneficiary

Beneficiary is the family member (spouse, child, parent or sibling) being sponsored by the petitioner. Provide the beneficiary’s information in this section.

Question 1. Alien Registration Number (A-Number) (if any): Enter beneficiary’s Alien Registration Number (also known as an “A-Number”, “A#” or “USCIS #”) here, if the beneficiary has one. Most beneficiaries do not have an A-Number. 

A-Numbers are usually assigned when an immigrant petition or application for Adjustment of Status is filed, or if the person has previously been issued an immigrant visa. 

An A-Number is also assigned to individuals placed in removal or deportation proceedings.

Some beneficiaries may have an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) that lists an A-Number that starts with a “1.” This number is not an A-Number. It is an EAD number and need not be listed here

Question 2. USCIS Online Account Number (if any): If the beneficiary has ever created an USCIS Online Account Number, enter it here.

If the beneficiary has previously filed certain applications or petitions on a paper form, they may have received a USCIS Online Account Access Notice issuing a USCIS Online Account Number. 

The USCIS Online Account Number (if any) can be found at the top of the notices for the previously filed petition or application. 

The USCIS Online Account Number is NOT the same as an A-Number.

If you don’t know or don’t have an USCIS online account number, leave this field blank.

Question 3. U.S. Social Security Number (if any): enter beneficiary’s U.S. Social Security Number (if any). If the beneficiary has ever been a Social Security Number saying “Valid with DHS authorization only”, enter it here.

Beneficiary’s Full Name

Questions 4.a. – 4.c. – Enter the beneficiary’s family name (last name), given name (first name), and middle name (if any). Provide the beneficiary’s full legal name as listed on their birth certificate unless the name has been legally changed (for example, through marriage or by court order). If the beneficiary has ever legally changed their name, a copy of all legal name change documents must be provided with Form I-130.

Other Names Used (if any)

Provide all other names the beneficiary has ever used, including aliases, maiden name, and nicknames

Questions 5.a. – 5.c. – Provide all other names the beneficiary has ever used, including:

  • Aliases
  • Maiden name
  • Nicknames
  • All variations of name spelling used

If the beneficiary has never used any other names, enter “N/A” in these fields. If the beneficiary needs more space to provide all other names used, enter it in Part 9 Additional Information (last page of the form).

Other Information About Beneficiary

Provide beneficiary’s information in this section.

Question 6. City/Town/Village of birth – Provide the beneficiary’s city/town/village of birth as listed on their birth certificate.

Question 7. Country of Birth – Enter the beneficiary’s country of birth as listed on their birth certificate.

Question 8. Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) – Enter the beneficiary’s date of birth in the mm/dd/yyyy format as listed on the birth certificate.

Question 9. Sex – Indicate whether the beneficiary is “Male” or “Female.” If the beneficiary’s current gender is different from the gender listed on their birth certificate, provide additional evidence.

Question 10. Has anyone else ever filed a petition for the beneficiary? – Answer “No” if no one ever filed an immigration petition for the beneficiary (for example, Form I-130, Form I-140 or Form I-129F). Answer “Yes” if an immigration petitioner was previously filed on behalf of the beneficiary. You can select “Unknown” only if you do not know, and the beneficiary truly does not know if anyone else has ever filed a petition in the past.

Beneficiary’s Physical Address

Questions 11.a – 11.h. – Enter the beneficiary’s current physical residential address (in the U.S. or outside the U.S.) 

Other Address and Contact Information

Questions 12 – 12.e. Address in the United States where the beneficiary intends to live: Enter the U.S. address where the beneficiary intends to live after completing their immigration process. If this U.S. address is the same as the beneficiary’s current residential physical address provided in response to Question 11, enter “Same” in the field 12.a. Street Number and Name.

Questions 13.a. – 13.f. – Beneficiary’s Address Outside the United States: Enter the beneficiary’s address outside the U.S. If this address is the same as the address provided in response to Question 11, enter “Same” in the field 13.a. If the beneficiary is currently living in the U.S., enter “N/A” in these fields.

Question 14. Daytime Telephone Number (if any) – Provide the beneficiary’s daytime telephone number (if any).

Question 15. Mobile Telephone number (if any) – Provide the beneficiary’s mobile phone number (if any).

Question 16. Email Address (if any) – Provide the beneficiary’s email address (if any). Keep in mind that the email address provided here will be used to receive important communications from the National Visa Center and the U.S. Embassy or Consulate (if the beneficiary is located abroad).

Beneficiary’s Marital Information

Question 17. How many times has the beneficiary been married? – Provide the number of times that the beneficiary has been married. If the beneficiary has never been married, enter “0.” If the beneficiary is currently married and never been married prior, enter “1.” Count all marriages, including annulled marriages. If the beneficiary married the same person more than once, count each marriage separately.

Question 18. Current Marital Status: Select one box that reflects the beneficiary’s current marital status:

  • Single, Never Married
  • Married
  • Divorced
  • Widowed
  • Separated
  • Annulled

Question 19. Date of Current Marriage (if currently married) – If the beneficiary is currently not married, enter “N/A”. If the beneficiary is currently married, enter the marriage date as listed on the beneficiary’s marriage certificate. 

Place of Beneficiary’s Current Marriage (if married)

Questions 20.a.-20.d. – If the beneficiary is currently not married, enter “N/A” in these fields. If the beneficiary is currently married, enter the city/town, state or province and country of marriage as listed on the beneficiary’s marriage certificate.

Names of Beneficiary’s Spouses (if any)

Provide information on the beneficiary’s current spouse (if currently married) first and then list all the beneficiary’s prior spouses (if any)

Spouse 1. Questions 21.a. – 22 – If the beneficiary is currently married, enter the full name of the beneficiary’s current spouse in these fields and enter “N/A” in the Date Marriage Ended (mm/dd/yyyy) field. If the beneficiary is not currently married, enter “N/A” in these fields. 

Spouse 2. Questions 23.a.-24 – If the beneficiary has been previously married, provide the names of all previous spouses and the dates that each marriage ended as listed on the divorce decree, death certificate or annulment decree. If the beneficiary needs more space to provide information about all previous marriages, provide it in Part 9. Additional Information.

Information About Beneficiary’s Family

Provide information about the beneficiary’s spouse and children.

Person 1. Questions 25.a.-28 – If the beneficiary is currently married, provide information about the beneficiary’s spouse in Person 1. Enter the spouse’s full name. Type “Spouse” in the “Relationship” field. Enter the spouse’s date of birth and country of birth as listed on the spouse’s birth certificate.

Person 2 – Person 5. Questions 29.a. – 44 – If the beneficiary has children, enter each child’s information separately. For each child enter the child’s full name. Type “Child” in the “Relationship” field. Enter the child’s date of birth and country of birth as listed on the child’s birth certificate. If additional space is needed to provide information about all beneficiary’s children, enter it in Part 9. Additional Information. Make copies of Part 9 if one page is not sufficient to provide all the requested information.

Beneficiary’s Entry Information

This section gathers information about the beneficiary’s previous entries into the U.S.

Question 45. Was the beneficiary EVER in the United States? – Answer “Yes” if the beneficiary has ever been previously in the U.S. and “No” if the beneficiary has never traveled to the U.S.

If the beneficiary is currently in the United States, complete Items Numbers 46.a.-46.d. – If the beneficiary is currently outside the U.S., enter “N/A” in Questions 46.a.-46.d.

Question 46.a. He or she arrived as a (Class of Admission) – if the beneficiary is currently in the U.S., enter the beneficiary’s class of admission as listed on I-94 which can be found online (if the beneficiary entered the U.S. after April 30, 2013). Prior to April 30, 2013, travelers received hard copy Form I-94s.

Question 46.b. Form I-94 Arrival Departure Record Number – if the beneficiary is currently in the U.S., enter the beneficiary’s Form I-94 number which is listed on the most recent I-94.

Question 46.c. Date of Arrival (mm/dd/yyyy) – if the beneficiary is currently in the U.S., enter the most recent arrival date as listed on the beneficiary I-94.

Question 46.d. Date authorized stay expired, or will expire, as shown on Form I-94 or Form I-95 (mm/dd/yyyy) or type or print “D/S” for Duration of Status – if the beneficiary is currently in the U.S., enter the “Admitted until” date as listed on the beneficiary’s I-94. If “DS” is listed on the I-94, enter “D/S” in this field.

Question 47. Passport Number – all beneficiaries (whether currently located in the US or outside the US) must provide their current passport number.

Question 48. Travel Document Number – if the beneficiary currently holds a travel document other than a passport (such as travel permit, refugee travel document, etc.) enter the travel document number here. Most beneficiaries do not have travel documents.

Note: A travel document is an official form of identification (other than a passport) that allows individuals to cross international borders for the purpose of travel.

Question 49. Country of Issuance for Passport or Travel Document – enter the country that issued the beneficiary’s passport (or travel document, if the beneficiary holds one).

Question 50. Expiration Date for Passport or Travel Document (mm/dd/yyyy) – enter the beneficiary’s passport number (or travel document, if the beneficiary holds one).

Beneficiary’s Employment Information

Provide the beneficiary’s current employment information (if applicable), even if they are employed outside of the United States. If the beneficiary is currently unemployed, type or print “Unemployed” in Item Number 51.a.

Questions 51.a. – 52. Beneficiary’s current employment – Enter the beneficiary’s current employment information, including the name and address of their employer and the date that their current employment began. Provide this information for all beneficiaries (whether employed in the US or outside the U.S.) If the beneficiary is currently unemployed, enter “Unemployed” in the 51.a. Field and enter the date on which their current period of unemployment began.

Additional Information About Beneficiary

Question 53. Was the beneficiary EVER in immigration proceedings? – Answer “Yes” if the beneficiary has ever been in immigration proceedings or is currently in immigration proceedings (examples: removal, deportation, exclusion, rescission, immigration court hearings). Answer “No” if the beneficiary has never been in immigration proceedings.

Question 54. If you answered “Yes”, select the type of proceedings and provide the location and date of the proceedings –  If the beneficiary has never been in immigration proceedings, enter “N/A” in questions 54 – 56. If the beneficiary is currently in immigration proceedings or has ever been in immigration proceedings select the type of proceedings:

  • Removal
  • Exclusion/Deportation
  • Rescission
  • Other Judicial Proceedings

Question 55.a. City or Town –  If the beneficiary is currently in immigration proceedings or has ever been in immigration proceedings enter the city or town of the proceedings (for example, city where the immigration court handling the beneficiary’s case is located).

Question 55.b. State – If the beneficiary is currently in immigration proceedings or has ever been in immigration proceedings enter the city or town of the proceedings (for example, state of the immigration court handling the beneficiary’s case).

Question 56. Date (mm/dd/yyyy) – If the beneficiary is currently in immigration proceedings or has ever been in immigration proceedings enter the date on which the immigration proceedings were initiated. 

Part 4. Information About Beneficiary (continued)

If the beneficiary’s native written language does not use Roman letters, type or print his or her name and foreign address in their native written language.

Questions 57.a. – 58.f. – If the beneficiary’s native alphabet does not use Roman letters (the alphabet used, for example in the English language), provide the beneficiary’s full name and physical address abroad in their native alphabet. This information can be handwritten using black ink (if typing it on a computer is impossible). If the beneficiary’s native alphabet uses Roman letters, enter “N/A” in these fields.

If filing for your spouse, provide the last address at which you physically lived together. If you never lived together, type or print, “Never lived together” in Item Number 59.a.

If the beneficiary is a child, parent or sibling of the petitioner, enter “N/A” in questions 59.a.-60.b.

Questions 59.a. – 60.b. Last Address the Petitioner and Beneficiary Lived Together – If Form I-130 is being filed for the petitioner’s spouse, enter the last address where the petitioner and beneficiary physically lived together (in the US or outside the U.S.). Provide the dates during which the couple lived together at that address. If the couple never physically lived together, enter “Never lived together” in the field 59.a. Street Number and Name.

The beneficiary is in the United States and will apply for adjustment of status to that of a lawful permanent resident at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in:

Question 61.a. City or Town – If the beneficiary is physically present in the US and plans to complete the immigration process in the US (without leaving the country), enter the city of a local USCIS field office. You can find the local USCIS field office that has jurisdiction over the beneficiary’s adjustment of status (Form I-485) case online (enter the beneficiary’s ZIP code). It is important to make the decision whether the beneficiary will apply for adjustment of status or consular processing (if the beneficiary holds a valid US visa and otherwise is eligible for Adjustment of Status). If you indicate on Form I-130 that the beneficiary will apply for Adjustment of Status in the US, USCIS will not forward the approved Form I-130 to the National Visa Center that handles immigrant visa applications. For example, if the petitioner indicates on Form I-130 that the beneficiary will apply for adjustment of status in the US but later changes their mind and would like to apply for an immigrant visa at a US Embassy or Consulate abroad, petitioner will need to file Form I-824, Application for Action on an Approved Application or Petition, to move the approved Form I-130 to the National Visa Center.

Question 61.b. State – Enter the state of the local USCIS field office where the beneficiary would like to apply for adjustment of status. Keep in mind that each USCIS local field office has jurisdiction over the beneficiary’s physical address. If the beneficiary will change their physical address before the Form I-485 is approved, the process can be significantly delayed due to change of local field office. It can take anywhere from 1 to 2 years (sometimes even longer) to complete Form I-485 application depending on the beneficiary’s physical address in the U.S.

The beneficiary will not apply for adjustment of status in the United States, but he or she will apply for an immigrant visa abroad at the U.S. Embassy or US Consulate in:

Questions 62.a.-62.c. – If the beneficiary does not hold a valid US visa, enter the location of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate located in the beneficiary’s home country. If the petitioner indicates that the beneficiary will apply for an immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate, then USCIS will forward the approved Form I-130 to the National Visa Center (NVC). If the beneficiary changes their mind and instead chooses to apply for adjustment of status in the US (if eligible), filing of Form I-824, Application for Action on an Approved Application or Petition, is not required. If the priority date is current according to the USCIS website, and the beneficiary otherwise is eligible for Adjustment of Status, Form I-485 can be filed with USCIS. In such a case, inform NVC that the beneficiary decided to apply for a green card in the US.

Part 5. Other Information

This section is completed by the petitioner.

Question 1. Have you EVER previously filed a petition for this beneficiary or any other alien? – Answer “Yes” if the petitioner has ever previously filed an immigration petition for the current beneficiary or for any other person. If the petitioner answered “Yes,” enter the name of the beneficiary of that petition, the location of the USCIS Service Center or USCIS Field Office where the petition was filed, the date that the petition was filed, and the result (approved, denied, pending, etc.) Answer “No” if the petitioner has never filed an immigration petition for the current beneficiary or any other family member in the past.

If you are also submitting separate petitions for other relatives, provide the names of and your relationship to each individual.

Relative 1 & Relative 2. Questions 6.a. – 9 – If the petitioner is filing Form I-130s for other family members at the same time, list the name(s) and relationship to the petitioner of the other beneficiaries for whom Form I-130s are being filed. For example, if the petitioner is filing Form I-130s for two siblings at the same time, the information for another sibling must be listed here. 

Part 6. Petitioner’s Statement, Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature

Question 1.a. – If the petitioner can comfortably read and understand the application in English, then check the box in Question 1.a.

The petitioner should carefully review the entire application for accuracy prior to signing.

Question 1.b. – If the petitioner is not proficient enough in reading English, then a competent interpreter needs to read through the application with the petitioner for accuracy review prior to signing. The interpreter need not be a professional interpreter but should be someone that is able to properly interpret the application. In such a case, the box in Question 1.b should be checked and the language used to interpret the application to the applicant should be entered (for example, Spanish, French, etc.)

Question 2 – The box for Question 2 should be checked if anyone has prepared the application at the petitioner’s request. If a preparer was used to prepare the application, Part 8 must be completed too.

Petitioner’s Contact Information

Question 3, 4, and 5 – Enter the petitioner’s daytime telephone number, cell phone number (if any), and email address (if any). Keep in mind that the petitioner’s email address provided in this field will be used to send email(s) from the National Visa Center (NVC) and U.S. Embassy or Consulate (if the beneficiary is located outside the US and will be applying for an immigrant visa abroad).

Petitioner’s Declaration and Certification

Petitioner’s Signature

Question 6.a. Petitioner’s Signature – the petitioners signs the form here. It must be an ink signature. USCIS does not accept stamped or typed signatures.

Question 6.b. – enter the date in mm/dd/yyyy format.

Part 7. Interpreter’s Contact Information, Certification, and Signature

If an interpreter was used to read the application to the petitioner in their native language, then Part 7 must be completed with the information about the interpreter. 

The interpreter must sign and date to certify that they are:

  • Fluent in English and the language the applicant used; 
  • They have completely read the application to the petitioner in that language;
  • The petitioner confirmed to understand the contents of the application; and 
  • The petitioner verified the accuracy of the application.

Part 7 is completed by entering the full legal name of the interpreter, the interpreter’s mailing address, daytime phone number, cell phone number (if any), email address (if any), and the language used to interpret the application to the applicant. The interpreter must then sign and date the application where indicated at Questions 7.a. and 7.b.

Part 8. Contact Information, Declaration, and Signature of the Person Preparing this Petition, if Other Than the Petitioner

Part 8 is completed by entering the preparer’s full name, organization name (if applicable), mailing address, daytime telephone number, fax number (if any), and email address (if any). 

The box at Question 7.b should be checked if an attorney has prepared the application.

The preparer must sign and date the application where indicated as Questions 8.a. and 8.b. attesting to certifications about the preparation and accuracy of the application.

Part 9. Additional Information

This section can be used if there is not enough space in any other parts of the form to provide all requested information. 

IMPORTANT! Even if no information is provided in Part 8, this page should still must be included with the application when submitted to USCIS. 

If you need additional space, make copies of this page to use to provide all requested information. 

If you are using Part 9 to provide additional information, enter:

  • Petitioner’s name 
  • Alien Registration Number (A-Number) (if any)
  • Indicate the Page Number, Part Number, and Item Number to which the answer refers.

Form I-130 filing address

  • If you file Form I-130 online, you do not need to mail any documents to USCIS
  • If you file Form I-130 by mail, the correct filing address depends on where the petitioner lives:

Form I-130 filing addresses

Place of petitioner’s residence

Where to mail

If the petitioner lives in:

Alaska

American Samoa

Arizona

California

Colorado

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

Florida

Guam

Hawaii

Idaho

Kansas

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Mexico

North Dakota

Oklahoma

Oregon

Puerto Rico

South Dakota

Texas

Utah

U.S. Virgin Islands

Washington

Wyoming

USCIS Phoenix Lockbox

U.S. Postal Service (USPS) deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: I-130
P.O. Box 21700
Phoenix, AZ 85036-1700

FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: I-130 (Box 21700)
2108 E. Elliot Rd.
Tempe, AZ 85284-1806

If the petitioner lives in:

Alabama

Arkansas

Armed Forces Americas

Armed Forces Europe

Armed Forces Pacific

Connecticut

Delaware

Georgia

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Marshall Islands

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Micronesia

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Palau

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Tennessee

Vermont

Virginia

Washington, D.C.

West Virginia

Wisconsin

USCIS Elgin Lockbox

U.S. Postal Service (USPS): 

USCIS
Attn: I-130
P.O. Box 4053
Carol Stream, IL  60197-4053

FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries: 

USCIS
Attn: I-130 (Box 4053)
2500 Westfield Drive
Elgin, IL 60124-7836

If the petitioner lives outside the U.S. USCIS Elgin Lockbox

U.S. Postal Service (USPS): 

USCIS
Attn: I-130
P.O. Box 4053
Carol Stream, IL  60197-4053

FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries: 

USCIS
Attn: I-130 (Box 4053)
2500 Westfield Drive
Elgin, IL 60124-7836

  • The filing addresses can change, so it’s essential to check the correct address on the official USCIS website
  • Failure to mail Form I-130 to the correct address might result in rejection of your application or significant delay in processing

Form I-130 processing time

  • The processing time for Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, can vary depending on several factors including:
    • Relationship between the petitioner and the beneficiary
    • Service center’s caseload, and 
    • Whether any additional evidence (Request for Evidence) is required
  • It takes about 12 months on average for USCIS to process Form I-130 (for immediate relatives and F2A)
  • Note: you cannot choose the USCIS Service Center that will process your Form I-130
  • Only USCIS can assign your petition to a certain service center

Form I-130 processing time according to USCIS website:

Form I-130 category

Processing time

U.S. citizen filing for a spouse, parent, or child under 21 (Immediate Relative) Our data:

  • Based on our clients’ cases, it takes 12 months on average to process Form I-130 in this category

USCIS data:

  • All service centers – 14 months
  • National Benefits Center – 53.5 months (this processing time is inaccurate, in our opinion)
  • All field offices – 51 months 
Permanent resident filing for a spouse or unmarried child under 21 (F2A category) Our data:

  • Based on our clients’ cases, it takes 12 months on average to process Form I-130 in this category

USCIS data:

  • California Service Center – 39.5 months
  • National Benefits Center – 64 months
  • Nebraska Service Center – 28 months
  • Potomac Service Center – 32.5 months
  • Texas Service Center – 36.5 months
  • Vermont Service Center – 34.5 months
  • All field offices – 74.5 months
Permanent resident filing for unmarried son or daughter 21 or older (F2B) USCIS data:

  • California Service Center – 73 months
  • National Benefits Center – 73 months
  • Nebraska Service Center – 43.5 months
  • Potomac Service Center – 43 months
  • Texas Service Center – 49.5 months
  • Vermont Service Center – 70 months
  • All field offices – 70 months
U.S. citizen filing for unmarried son/daughter 21 or older (F1 category) USCIS data:

  • California Service Center – 78 months
  • National Benefits Center – 69 months
  • Nebraska Service Center – 22.5 months
  • Potomac Service Center – 46 months
  • Texas Service Center – 46.5 months
  • Vermont Service Center – 48 months
  • All field offices – 86.5 months 
U.S. citizen filing for a married son or daughter (F3 category) USCIS data:

  • California Service Center – 87.5 months
  • National Benefits Center – 65 months
  • Nebraska Service Center – 46.5 months
  • Potomac Service Center – 46 months
  • Texas Service Center – 49 months
  • Vermont Service Center – 48.5 months
U.S. citizen filing for a brother or sister (F4 category) USCIS data:

  • California Service Center – 46.5 months
  • National Benefits Center – 68 months
  • Nebraska Service Center – 22.5 months
  • Potomac Service Center – 42.5 months
  • Texas Service Center – 45.5 months
  • Vermont Service Center – 49.5 months
  • All field offices – 83.5 months
  • To get the current processing time, visit the official USCIS Processing Times 
  • Choose “Form I-130”
  • Choose your category
  • Choose your service center
  • You can find the service center processing your application on the Form I-130 receipt notice in the left bottom corner
  •  Keep in mind that processing times are general estimates, and individual cases may take less or more time to complete
  • Additionally, USCIS may issue Requests for Evidence (RFEs) during the processing of your application, which can add to the overall processing time
  • It’s crucial to respond promptly and thoroughly if you receive an RFE to avoid delays
  • If your case is outside the normal processing time, you can place an Outside Normal Processing Time e-Request or request assistance from your local congressman’s office

What happens after Form I-130 is approved

Filing Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, is typically the first step in the process of sponsoring a family member for a green card in the U.S.

Once the Form I-130 is approved by USCIS, the case will move forward in the immigration process. 

Here’s what generally happens after Form I-130 is approved:

If the beneficiary is in the U.S.

If the beneficiary is outside the U.S.

  • If the beneficiary has entered the US on a valid visa, the priority date is current and is otherwise eligible for Adjustment of Status, Forms I-485, I-864, I-765 and I-131 can be filed with USCIS
  • If the beneficiary has entered the US on a valid visa and is an immediate relative of a US citizen (spouse, parent or unmarried child under 21), there’s no need to wait until Form I-130 is approved. Forms I-485, I-864, I-765 and I-131 can be filed:
    • At the same time as Form I-130 (“concurrent filing”)
    • After Form I-130 is filed but before it’s approved
    • After Form I-130 is approved
  • USCIS schedules an interview at the local field offices (sometimes interviews are waived)
  • Beneficiary attends the interview (if scheduled)
  • Form I-485 is approved
  • Green card is delivered by mail
  • If the green card is obtained through marriage and was issued for 2 years only, Form I-751 must be filed to remove conditions
  • If the priority date is current, the petitioner and the beneficiary will receive an email from the National Visa Center (NVC) with instructions on accessing the Form DS-260 
  • Beneficiary completes Form DS-260 and uploads civil documents
  • Petitioner uploads signed Form I-864 (Affidavit of Support) and supporting documents
  • Case is marked as “documentarily qualified” by NVC
  • Petitioner and beneficiary receive an email from the US Embassy/Consulate with further instructions
  • Interview at the US Embassy/Consulate is scheduled
  • Beneficiary attends the interview
  • Beneficiary obtains an immigrant visa
  • Beneficiary pays the USCIS Immigrant Fee prior to entering the US
  • Beneficiary enters the US on an immigrant visa
  • Beneficiary receives a green card in the US by mail
  • If the green card is obtained through marriage and was issued for 2 years only, Form I-751 must be filed to remove conditions

Learn more: Form I-130 is Approved – What to Do Next?

Related Links:

Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative

How to Fill Out Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative – Step-By-Step Instructions

Form I-130 Checklist of Required Documents